The Husbandry Economic Project (HEP) was born at the beginning of 2018 with the hopes of empowering families of the Love In Action Initiative (LIA) to build a better future. Through previous experience, MH4H knew that it wasn’t effective to give out pregnant goats without following up with the new goat owner. Nor was it practical to assume that the recipients were already well-versed in goat care. This distribution method resulted in low survival rates of sickly goats and meager contact with the LIA families. Acknowledging these teaching experiences, MH4H sought a way to raise healthier goatherds and invest more intentionally into our community. 

 

Read about LIA and HEP here.

 

In January 2018, two dedicated staff members of the MH4H agronomy department, David Alcina and Kely Marcelin, were chosen to train as Veterinary Agents at the AgHorizen’s Vet Clinic and Training Center just outside of Port au Prince. This ten-month commitment sent the men to the Training Center for a week each month to receive intensive training in veterinary care. The off-weeks they returned home were spent studying and practicing what they had just learned.

“Each month we took a test before we could advance to the next level. If you failed, then you had to pay extra money to retest. This challenged us to study hard.

“The hardest subject was in diagnosing diseases and determining the proper medicine to give [the sick animal]. Eight of thirty students failed this test. But [Kely and I] advanced! The graduation is this coming August.” – David Alcina

 

In January 2018, two dedicated staff members of the MH4H agronomy department, David Alcina and Kely Marcelin, were chosen to train as Veterinary Agents at the AgHorizen’s Vet Clinic and Training Center just outside of Port au Prince. This ten month commitment sent the men to the Training Center for a week each month to receive intensive training in veterinary care. The off-weeks they returned home were spent studying and practicing what they had just learned. 

“Each month we took a test before we could advance to the next level. If you failed, then you had to pay extra money to retest. This challenged us to study hard. 

“The hardest subject was in diagnosing diseases and determining the proper medicine to give [the sick animal]. Eight of thirty students failed this test. But [Kely and I] advanced! The graduation is this coming August.” – David Alcina

The new vet agents also learned the importance of pursuing open conversations within the community they served. Only in truly listening to the animal owner’s observations and patiently communicating a diagnosis and practical advice will they solve the problem. The men know that it will take time and repetition to see a real shift in the overall health of local goatherds but they are up for the challenge!

The new vet agents also learned the importance of pursuing open conversations within the community they served. Only in truly listening to the animal owner’s observations and patiently communicating a diagnosis and practical advice will they solve the problem. The men know that it will take time and repetition to see a real shift in the overall health of local goatherds but they are up for the challenge!

“I believe in these guys to work with the families. They give good service,”
Claudin Augustin

Recently, a baby goat was attacked by a dog in the community and needed immediate attention. Thanks to Kely and David’s care and training, the kid is on the mend!

In addition to answering emergency calls, the newly trained vet agents invite all HEP participants to bring their goats to MH4H for a monthly check-up. This allows them to track the goats’ health and regularly follow up with the families, teaching them to properly care for the animals. More importantly, this meeting allows Many Hands staff more opportunities to invest in the community of Sylvain relationally, spiritually, and practically.

“I believe in these guys to work with the families. They give good service,” Head Agronomist Claudin Augustin said when asked why David and Kely were chosen to receive the veterinary training. MH4H is blessed to invest in our team members because we believe God can and will use them to reach the people of Haiti.

Recently, a baby goat was attacked by a dog in the community and needed immediate attention. Thanks to Kely and David’s care and training, the kid is on the mend!

In addition to answering emergency calls, the newly trained vet agents invite all HEP participants to bring their goats to MH4H for a monthly check-up. This allows them to track the goats’ health and regularly follow up with the families, teaching them to properly care for the animals. More importantly, this meeting allows Many Hands staff more opportunities to invest in the community of Sylvain relationally, spiritually, and practically.  

“I believe in these guys to work with the families. They give good service,” Head Agronomist Claudin Augustin said when asked why David and Kely were chosen to receive the veterinary training. MH4H is blessed to invest in our team members because we believe God can and will use them to reach the people of Haiti.

1 Comment

  1. Dionysia Kopunovics

    I love to read each one of the many hands reports, I find them inspiring and uplifting,and so lovely to see God’s hands and a lovely challenge to look at where i am in my walk with our Heavenly Father …I pray for each one of you.

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

{"cart_token":"","hash":"","cart_data":""}